August 31st - The Athletic Sprint Omnium

I went back and dug out some photos of the first time Clint put on his Omnium event. I'm not sure what the name was at the time, but I am sure that it was awesome. However, I missed it. Not wanting to miss an opportunity to take a few snaps of the Alpenrose Velodrome and the surrounding, I did just that.

There was one team that was doing some sort of workouts after the racing was over. I noticed that it was the same team this last time when we held the PDW Omnium event and asked Clint about it. He said that they were always practicing for something, but that they never come out to race. I wonder what they are practicing for? 

Things they could be practicing for: 
- a remake of some scenes from the upcoming Cheetah: The Nelson Vails Story
- National Caliber Track Events with Dean Tracy
- to prepare for cyclocross season 
- fitness 

In any case, an empty velodrome is just as good as a full one to take photos. Especially on a bright sunny day with a film camera (and Porta 160). Look for some lines. Watch the parallel hash marks there, one in shadow of the other. Cut a diagonal line with a pole there for that arty feel. And all the while ponder this team out chasing one another mere minutes after the racing has packed up and moved on. 

Then, when you really want to read something about film and its process. Read John Prolly's recent : How Film Made Me A Better Photographer - or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love the Film. It is a much more interesting read than what I just put together here.

However, I did read something — and I'm trying to remember where — that made me think a lot about photography and the different ways that people take photos. Personally, since we are on that subject, I take a lot of photos because I like to, but I also do it because it helps when I try to go back and write something about the subject. This way, years later I can say that the grass in the middle of the velodrome was dry and crisp and needed some water. Or that the OBRA van was lurking up near the cow pasture, keeping a watchful eye on everything. But, what I read was from a photographer who said that he never actually referred to himself as such in the field, he always mentioned that he was a "photojournalist" when asked what he was doing taking pictures. And then he furthered the notion with "people seemed to leave me alone if they thought I was taking pictures for that reason over art" << don't be fooled, I may have put "" around that, but its a bit more of a paraphrasing.

It also might be paraphrasing to say that someone once told me "the only reason that you end up with a lot of pretty good pictures, is because you take a fuckload of pictures." But, again, that might be paraphrasing.

These are the things I think about whenever I find myself in the midst of a "shooting frenzy." Which is also what I might call taking a lot of pictures. 

Disclaimer: I may have mentioned earlier here that a good flyer was a really important step towards getting people to come and enjoy your event. This is true and yet I feel that I have failed in this endeavor. However, I tried, but, damn the amount of information that you need to express with these things. It is incredible.